Accurate Magpro

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Liberty

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I recently picked up a couple pounds of Accurate Magpro to load under Bergers in .243 and 7mm mag. It is a spherical powder, and it meters like water thru both my RCBS and Redding powder measures. The impacts were about the same or slightly higher than with IMR 4350, but Magpro is extremely easy to use. The impacts vs previous zero could have been affected by the warm temptertures during testing. No trickling needed with the Redding. The RCBS couldn't throw big enough charges for the 7mm mag. There will be no chronographing until after deer season for obvious reasons. My testing was done on a range instead of out behind the barn. The biggest plus for me was MOA or better accuracy at max -.5 grain charges! The rifles are both known good shooters. In my reloading adventures, I have noticed that with many powders, max loads don't always deliver stellar accuracy. Also, I was very pleased with the degree of pressure signs left on the case heads and CCI primers. Please start low and carefully work up charges, as all rifles are different. Hope this helps other reloaders shooting overbore rounds.
 
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Huddy

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I'm always game for more information. I just picked up an RCBS kit and sat through the free Hornady class at AO. Seemed like good info.
 
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Liberty

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I'm always game for more information. I just picked up an RCBS kit and sat through the free Hornady class at AO. Seemed like good info.
RCBS is where it's at. IMR 4064 is the most versatile non-magnum rifle powder, though it doesn't meter very well. Unique is the most versatile pistol powder. If you can only choose 2, those are where I would start.
 

Jake

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I'd love to get into reloading some day, I just don't have the space, money or time right now to get into it. I'd like to see some more reloading content though to study up on it until I'm able to get setup for reloading.
 
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Liberty

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The Magpro delivered 100 fps and better velocity confirmed with a chronograph than box listed velocity from my .270. My rifle is a 22 inch barrel Savage with 130's. Bullets were seated longer than sammi minimum, but under cartridge oal. This is my new powder for .243, .270, and 7mm Mag. I am not impressed often, but Accurate/ Western Powders really delivers more than expected! 7mm Mag with Bergers kills humanely in real world testing.
 
Reactions: War Paint
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Just remember that Magpro is a spherical double base powder and temp sensitive. If you redline it in the fall/winter, the summer may get a bit to exciting. I'm sure you know this @handloader , but others may not. I've chased velocity in the past, shooting at 1k plus, and 100 fps isn't worth the temp sensitivity - to me at least. I'd rather have the more consistent load shooting from 20 degrees to 105. Hell, the main reason I roll my own is for high consistency. RL16, H4350, etc. Just my two cents.
 
Reactions: Liberty

Jake

AKA "Scooter"
Super Moderator
Lifetime Supporter
Aug 11, 2015
12,845
14,941
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Southern Gwinnett/Northern Rockdale
Zip code
30039
Just remember that Magpro is a spherical double base powder and temp sensitive. If you redline it in the fall/winter, the summer may get a bit to exciting. I'm sure you know this @handloader , but others may not. I've chased velocity in the past, shooting at 1k plus, and 100 fps isn't worth the temp sensitivity - to me at least. I'd rather have the more consistent load shooting from 20 degrees to 105. Hell, the main reason I roll my own is for high consistency. RL16, H4350, etc. Just my two cents.
I wish I understood what all of this meant. I really need to start doing some research and acquiring some reloading gear/components. With stocking 300 BLK, .44 Mag, .500 S&W Mag, and .308 now it would be worth it to get into reloading. I had consolidated calibers down to 9mm, .45 ACP, 5.56, 5.45 and 7.62x39 so it wasn't really worth it before but now it would be.
 
Reactions: Liberty
Apr 10, 2016
1,795
1,704
113
Gwinnett
Zip code
30519
I wish I understood what all of this meant. I really need to start doing some research and acquiring some reloading gear/components. With stocking 300 BLK, .44 Mag, .500 S&W Mag, and .308 now it would be worth it to get into reloading. I had consolidated calibers down to 9mm, .45 ACP, 5.56, 5.45 and 7.62x39 so it wasn't really worth it before but now it would be.
So very much there to try and explain, but I'll attempt a quick synopsis. There are two basic powder mixes. Double base and single base. Single based is made from nitrocellulose. In double base powder, nitro glycerin is added. Double based powders burn faster. Faster burn = more velocity. BUT, nitroglycerin is very temp sensitive. So, it is going to have pretty dramatic (relatively) burn rates at 20 vs 50 vs 80 vs 100 degree temps. For rifles and what people are trying to determine, is where the bullet leaves the barrel on a particular node over a range of powder charge weights. The varying charge weights is pretty well telling of how a charge will shoot over temp variences. higher charge weight equals higher temps. Lower charge rates equal lower temps. In theory, with a single base, you need less of a consistent window than you do with a double base as the single base is not as temp sensitive. Some single bases are more consistent than others. Varget, H4350, RL16, RL17 are just a few. They are different powders from different companies.

Pistol powders burn extremely fast. Throw a pistol powder in a rifle, and kaboom.

It's all very sciency. That's why there are different powders for different cartridges. Trying to time the powder burn rate to a rate at which it will completely burn, but not too fast as to turn the trigger into a detonation control. Different powder composites, shapes, size. It all matters.

Best advice I can give, get with someone who know what they are talking about. Talk to them. See their set-up. Also, READ A DAMN RELOADING BOOK. My suggestion, start with The ABC's of Reloading. Then, get reloading manuals from the bullet manufacturers or press manufacturers. They give a quick intro, and then give you min and max charges for various powders and projectiles. Not to mention other key measurements of each cartridge. If you really want to dive into ballistics, particularly rifle, read Applied Ballistics. Wonderful resource. Bryan Litz does a great job of getting all nerd sciency, but stating things in a way the rest of us can understand. Absolutely the leading ballistician today.